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Thursday, 22 September 2016

WATCH: Sacramento cops kill mentally ill black man with 14 shots for ‘gesturing’ at them + RAMSEY ORTA + Charlotte Police Kill Disabled Black Man

The family of a mentally ill black man seeks justice after Sacramento police finally showed them video of officers gunning down 50-year-old Joseph Mann during a foot chase in July.
Mann’s family has been asking to see video evidence of the shooting captured by a surveillance cameras, and now that they’ve seen it — they have even more questions, reported KOVR-TV.
 
The videos show officers open fire on Mann after he stops running, apparently out of breath, and raises a knife toward them standing at least 10 feet away.
Police were called July 11 to North Sacramento, where two 911 callers reported that Mann had a knife and a gun and was acting erratically, although the second caller admitted she did not see the gun herself.

Investigators never found a gun after Mann was fatally shot during the confrontation.

Witnesses said they saw Mann urinate on himself and then begin tapping on an imaginary keyboard, and they called police after seeing him toss a 4-inch knife into the air and catch it by the handle, reported the Sacramento Bee.

A patrol car followed Mann down the street as officers ordered him to drop the knife, but they said he shouted threats at police and then performed karate-style moves.

Police said Mann then charged the patrol car with the knife held above his head, and officers, “fearing for their lives and the safety of the community,” fired 18 rounds at the man, striking him 14 times.
Mann’s family faulted police for failing to de-escalate the 11-minute encounter with a mentally ill suspect.

For them to just get out they cars and start shooting my brother, you know, being judge, jury and God — it’s just not right,” said Robert Mann, the slain man’s brother.
The family’s attorney said dashboard camera video shows Mann was not as much of a threat to officers as police have said, and the surveillance video shows he was several feet away from the police who opened fire on him.

“He was gesturing and pointing,” said attorney John Burris. “He was not lunging or charging, so from a police point of view, they should not have used deadly force at that time. They were in a position of safety. They could have remained in a position of safety.”

Mann’s family wants the officers involved in the fatal shooting to be fired immediately and prosecuted.
They have filed a federal civil rights lawsuit and a claim against the city charging that officers “confronted and aggressively pursued” Mann before fatally shooting him.

For them to just get out they cars and start shooting my brother, you know, being judge, jury and God — it’s just not right,” said Robert Mann, the slain man’s brother.

The family’s attorney said dashboard camera video shows Mann was not as much of a threat to officers as police have said, and the surveillance video shows he was several feet away from the police who opened fire on him.

He was gesturing and pointing,” said attorney John Burris. “He was not lunging or charging, so from a police point of view, they should not have used deadly force at that time. They were in a position of safety. They could have remained in a position of safety.”

Mann’s family wants the officers involved in the fatal shooting to be fired immediately and prosecuted.
They have filed a federal civil rights lawsuit and a claim against the city charging that officers “confronted and aggressively pursued” Mann before fatally shooting him.



source: http://www.rawstory.com/2016/09/watch-sacramento-cops-kill-mentally-ill-black-man-with-14-shots-for-gesturing-at-them/

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Urgent Petition
 
 

Charlotte's Police Chief Refuses to Release Video of Keith Scott Murder


 
SIGN THE PETITION
Charlotte Chief of Police, Kerr Putney, is refusing to release the police video of the killing of Keith Lamont Scott and telling the public to trust the word of the police. The public has a right to know what is on that video. We have the right to hold our police accountable!
 
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Person Killed in Charlotte Protests + DISGRACEFUL:  Protesters clash with police after Charlotte cops kill disabled black man holding a book

Person Killed in Charlotte Protests After Fatal Police Shooting of Keith Scott

                                     

Police muster on second night of protest 2:28
Image: Protests in Charlotte, N.C.
Police and protesters carry a seriously wounded protester into the parking area of the Omni Hotel in Charlotte, N.C., on Wednesday night. Brian Blanco / Getty Images

The family of Keith Lamont Scott, 43, who was shot and killed Tuesday near the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, urged protesters to demonstrate peacefully. But demonstrators and cops faced off again, this time outside the Omni Hotel downtown.
Demonstrators had begun dispersing after a planned protest at Charlotte's Marshall Park when some of them tried to enter the Omni and other hotels nearby, police told NBC News.
NBC station WCNC broadcast video of police taking at least two people into custody. A CNN reporter was knocked to the ground as he was reporting live on the air.

Concussion grenade blasts could be heard as news reporters urged their colleagues on live TV to flee the area.
Scott's family initially told local news outlets Tuesday that he was disabled and unarmed. They claimed on social media that he had been reading a book.
But Charlotte-Mecklenburg County Police Chief Kerr Putney said at a news conference Wednesday not only that was Scott armed but also that he ignored multiple warnings to drop his weapon before Officer Brentley Vinson fatally shot him.
IMAGE: Charlotte, N.C., protest
Demonstrators protest the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C., on Wednesday night. Chuck Burton / AP
"The officers gave loud, clear, verbal commands which were also heard by many of the witnesses," Charlotte-Mecklenburg County Police Chief Kerr Putney said at a news conference Wednesday morning, noting that the fatal confrontation unfolded "in a matter of seconds."

Like Scott, Vinson is African-American. In line with department policy, Vinson, a two-year veteran of the force, was placed on paid administrative leave, Putney said.
In a statement released after Putney's remarks Wednesday, Scott's widow, Rakeyia Scott, did not repeat family members' claims that Keith Scott was unarmed.
While she said the family still had "more questions than answers about Keith's death," she said they urged that "people protest peacefully."



Police: Keith Lamont Scott Refused to Drop Gun Before Fatal Shooting 2:37

"Please do not hurt people or members of law enforcement, damage property or take things that do not belong to you in the name of protesting," Rakeyia Scott said.

Scott had been sitting in his car at The Village at College Downs complex near the University of North Carolina at Charlotte when officers searching for someone else with an outstanding warrant arrived before 4 p.m. ET Tuesday, Putney said.

Police said in a statement that officers saw Scott holding a handgun as he exited his car and returned to his vehicle. He then exited again as officers approached him and posed an "imminent deadly threat," according to the statement.

Putney said officers instructed Scott to "drop the weapon" after he got out of his car, but he failed to comply. He was given aid and taken to Carolinas Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.
Image: Charlotte-Mecklenburg County police Officer Brentley Vinson.
Charlotte-Mecklenburg County police Officer Brentley Vinson. Michelle Boudin / WCNC-TV

Putney said that Vinson was in plainclothes with a police vest and was not wearing a body camera but that three other officers on the scene did have them. The video was being reviewed along with cruiser dashcam video, and there were no immediate plans to make the videos public, he added.
U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Wednesday that the Justice Department is "assessing the incident." Federal authorities this week opened a separate investigation into the shooting of an unarmed black man by police in Tulsa, Okla.

source: http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/person-shot-charlotte-protests-after-fatal-police-shooting-keith-scott-n652331?cid=eml_nbn_20160921

 DISGRACEFUL:  Protesters clash with police after Charlotte cops kill disabled black man holding a book
 21 Sep 2016 at 06:19 ET


Protesters blocked a highway and clashed with police in Charlotte, North Carolina, early on Wednesday morning after officers fatally shot a black man they said had a gun when they approached him in a parking lot.

About a dozen officers and several protesters suffered non-life threatening injuries during an hours-long demonstration near where Keith Lamont Scott, 43, was shot by a policeman on Tuesday afternoon, police and local media said on social media.
Early Wednesday morning, protesters blocked Interstate 85, where they stole boxes from trucks and started fires before police used flash grenades in an attempt to disperse the angry crowd, an ABC affiliate in Charlotte reported.

A group of protesters then tried to break into a Walmart store before police arrived and began guarding its front entryway, video footage by local media showed.

Earlier in the evening, police in riot gear reportedly used tear gas on protesters who threw rocks and water bottles at them as they wielded large sticks and blocked traffic. One officer was sent to the hospital after being struck in the head by a rock, police said.
 
Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts urged for calm.
                                          
“The community deserves answers and (a) full investigation will ensue,” she said on Twitter, adding in a subsequent post, “I want answers too.”

Scott was shot by officer Brentley Vinson earlier in the day, according to Charlotte-Mecklenburg police. The shooting occurred when officers were at an apartment complex searching for a suspect with an outstanding warrant and they saw Scott get out of his vehicle with a firearm, the department said.

Vinson fired his weapon and struck Scott, who “posed an imminent deadly threat to the officers,” the department said in a statement.

Vinson, who joined the Charlotte police force in July 2014, is black, according to the department. He has been placed on paid administrative leave.

NATIONAL DEBATE

The fatal shooting came amid an intense national debate over the use of deadly force by police, particularly against black men.

Police did not immediately say if Scott was the suspect they had originally sought at the apartment complex. WSOC-TV, a local television station, reported that he was not.

Detectives recovered the gun Scott was holding at the time of the shooting and were interviewing witnesses, police said.
Protesters and Scott’s family disputed that the dead man was armed. Some family members told reporters that Scott had been holding a book and was waiting for his son to be dropped off from school.

Shakeala Baker, who lives in a neighboring apartment complex, said she had seen Scott in the parking lot on previous afternoons waiting for his child. But on Tuesday, she watched as medics tended to Scott after he was shot, she said.

This is just sad,” said Baker, 31. “I get tired of seeing another black person shot every time I turn on the television. But (police are) scared for their own lives. So if they’re scared for their lives, how are they going to protect us?”

About 200 people gathered earlier Tuesday night for a peaceful protest in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where a white officer killed an unarmed black man last week in an incident captured on police videos.

Lawyers for the family of Terence Crutcher, 40, disputed that he posed any threat before he was shot by Tulsa Officer Betty Shelby after his sport utility vehicle broke down on Friday.
(Reporting by Brendan O’Brien in Milwaukee; Editing by Tom Heneghan)

source:  http://www.rawstory.com/2016/09/protesters-clash-with-police-after-charlotte-cops-kill-disabled-black-man-holding-a-book-photos/

Two Years After Eric Garner's Death, Ramsey Orta, Who Filmed Police, Is Only One Heading to Jail - DEMOCRACY NOW! + more WATCH
 
@WeCopwatch @WeCopwatch @WeCopwatch


July 13, 2016



 This is viewer supported news
Two years ago this week, Eric Garner died in Staten Island after officers wrestled him to the ground, pinned him down and applied a fatal chokehold. The man who filmed the police killing of Eric Garner, Ramsey Orta, is now heading to jail for four years on unrelated charges—making him the only person at the scene of Garner’s killing who will serve jail time.

Last week Orta took a plea deal on weapons and drug charges. He says he has been repeatedly arrested and harassed by cops since he filmed the fatal police chokehold nearly two years ago. We speak to Eric Garner’s daughter, Erica Garner, and Matt Taibbi, award-winning journalist with Rolling Stone magazine. He’s working on a book on Eric Garner’s case.

TRANSCRIPT

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.
AMY GOODMAN: Video made by Laron Murray and The Fortune Society media team featuring the final words of Eric Garner over John Coltrane’s "Alabama." This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman, with Juan González.
JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Well, we turn now to another police killing, this one here in New York. Two years ago this week, Eric Garner died in Staten Island after officers wrestled him to the ground, pinned him down and applied a fatal chokehold.
POLICE OFFICER 1: Put your hand behind your head!
ERIC GARNER: I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe!
RAMSEY ORTA: Once again, police beating up on people.
POLICE OFFICER 2: Back up. Back up and get on those steps.
RAMSEY ORTA: OK.
JUAN GONZÁLEZ: The man who filmed the police killing of Eric Garner, Ramsey Orta, is now heading to jail for four years on unrelated charges—making him the only person at the scene of Garner’s killing who will serve jail time. Last week, Orta took a plea deal on weapons and drug charges. He says he has been repeatedly arrested and harassed by cops since he filmed the fatal police chokehold nearly two years ago.
AMY GOODMAN: Eric Garner’s death spurred protests over New York Police Department’s use of excessive force, its policy of cracking down on low-level offenses. Eric Garner’s family reached a $5.9 million settlement with New York City last July.
To talk more about where the case stands today and the fact that Ramsey Orta will be going to jail, and also Bernie Sanders’ concession to Hillary Clinton—Eric Garner’s daughter, Erica Garner, who joins us today, campaigned with Bernie Sanders. He had a TV campaign ad centered on her story. We’re also joined by Matt Taibbi, the award-winning journalist with Rolling Stone magazine, working on a book on Eric Garner’s case, the author of a number of books, including The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap.
We welcome you both to Democracy Now! I’m so sorry, Erica, as you sit here to see video after video of police killing culminating right now, and once again seeing the video of your father gasping and saying, "I can’t breathe." But you have been speaking out publicly about this for almost the full two years. You haven’t stopped.
ERICA GARNER: Yes. I’ve protested. I’ve spoke on panels. I traveled across this nation. I exhaust all avenues. I even endorsed Bernie Sanders to get my message out. And it’s like we keep having a conversation I exhausted for two years. And, you know, how much talking do we need to have? The Black Lives Matter movement been very compassionate, patient, and basically begging the nation. You know, we are under attack as black people. We are being gunned down every day. And these officers are not being held accountable. And no charges, from Tamir Rice to my dad to Freddie Gray, you know, has been.
JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And your reaction when, obviously, the events last week—two more incidents, two more deaths, caught on video, and yet nothing seems to be happening?
ERICA GARNER: No. All I’m hearing is conversation. We need legislation put into place. We need a special prosecutor. They’re just now using the special crimes prosecutor for a guy last week named [Delrawn Small]. And that was the undercover police officer who shot a black man.
AMY GOODMAN: Wayne Isaacs was the off-duty police officer who shot Delrawn Small.
ERICA GARNER: Yes. And it’s like, you know, we need some type of legislation put into place. We need a special prosecutor. Governor Cuomo put that as an executive order temporarily after my father passed away, and no one is talking about it. You know, no one is trying to make it permanent.
AMY GOODMAN: The reason we know exactly what happened in your father’s death is because of that videotape. The man who filmed the police killing of your father, Eric Garner, Ramsey Orta, is now headed to jail for four years on unrelated charges—making him the only person at the scene of Garner’s killing who will serve jail time. So, last week, Ramsey Orta took a plea deal on weapons and drug charges. He has said he’s been repeatedly arrested and harassed by police. Earlier this year, Ramsey Orta came to Democracy Now!, and we talked to him.
RAMSEY ORTA: Clearly, when they jumped out on me, that was the first thing that came out his mouth: "You filmed us, so now we’re filming you," because I asked, "Why do you have your cameras out?" When they jumped out on me, they had their phones in their hand, instead of a gun or anything, from my knowledge, was supposed to be in their hand. So I asked him: Why is he filming me? And he said, "Because you filmed us."
AMY GOODMAN: So that is Ramsey Orta speaking on Democracy Now! The significance of what he did? Soon after your dad was killed, at a memorial service that was held, there’s actual applause during the service for one man, for Ramsey Orta, who was sitting in the audience.
ERICA GARNER: Yes, it showed the courage to do it, and also he told the whole world, like he showed the whole world, you know, what exactly went on. If there wasn’t no video, you know, we wouldn’t know, like, he was killed. And we don’t have that from the police department. We don’t have transparency. I knew body cameras would be a bad idea if it wasn’t a federal legislation or some type of thing that says if you mess with this camera, if you turn it off or if anything goes wrong with this camera, you know, you will be held accountable. And now you’re hearing cases like the camera fell off, like in Alton Sterling case, or, you know, it’s basically our word against theirs.
JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Matt Taibbi, I wanted to bring you in. You’ve been doing research specifically on the Eric Garner case and trying to look at this whole issue of police killings. This whole issue of, as we’ve seen, of the—in the Alton Sterling case, where somebody does do independent filming, and they’re confiscated; meanwhile, the police cameras fall off—the importance of these cameras and the battle over cameras?
MATT TAIBBI: I mean, it’s critically important that citizens make these recordings. I think the Eric Garner case is a classic example of why this is necessary, because reports later surfaced that the official police report later that evening left out the fact that a chokehold had been used. And so, had there been no film of what happened, we might never have heard of this case. It would have gone down probably as an accident that took place, where a person who was in bad health simply gave out in the middle of a routine arrest. But we—you know, because we have that video, we saw exactly what happened. So it’s critically important that people make these videos. And I think what’s going on now is that everybody has cellphones, and for the first time people are seeing how common this is.
AMY GOODMAN: Can you talk, Erica Garner, about what’s happening now with the federal investigation? I mean, the police officer in the case was not charged. You did have a lawsuit, the family had a lawsuit, that was settled for $5.9 million. But the federal investigation, what is that? And this is two years now.
ERICA GARNER: Yes. It’s like the DOJ is dragging their feet. A couple of months ago, I sat in a civil liberties panel with representatives from the DOJ. And I kindly asked them, you know, face to face, as we was on the panel, you know, "What is taking so long? How come my family didn’t get no answers, any type of updates on my father’s case?" And they told me, you know, they will answer my question soon. Here we are almost to the two-year anniversary, and I hear—I see an article out about, you know, how two federal prosecutors from the DA in Brooklyn and two prosecutors from Washington is fighting over whether or not it’s enough evidence to go on. You know, the Brooklyn side is saying, "Well, we don’t have enough evidence," but the people from Washington are saying, "Well, we do. We want to push forward." And it’s up to Loretta Lynch to make that decision.
JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And even some of the basic information, two years later, is not out. For instance, the past record of the officer involved, Pantaleo, in terms of his excessive force decisions in—previously. What’s happened with that?
ERICA GARNER: No. I put in countless FOIA requests. Matt Taibbi helped me with some of the letters. And the response I got was letters stuck underneath my door or in my mailbox from the NYPD telling me I have to ask Daniel Pantaleo for permission to look at his records and that what I’m asking for is unwarranted. What can be more warranted than his daughter asking, just simply asking about what complaints was made against this man?
AMY GOODMAN: And, Matt Taibbi, if you could talk more about this and this major piece the Times did about how—this battle that’s going on within the Justice Department about whether to even continue with this investigation into the Eric Garner death?
MATT TAIBBI: Yeah, if I could just follow up quickly, though, on this issue of the personnel records with—of Daniel Pantaleo. This has been a fight that’s been going on for two years. The Legal Aid Society last year filed suit and actually got a judge to order the Civilian Complaint Review Board to disclose very limited information about basically just how many substantiated abuse complaints there were in Pantaleo’s file. And the city at that point could have just released the information, but they chose to appeal, and they’re fighting this basically to the death. It’s now two years. It’s probably going to be three years before this is resolved. And the law is really not on the civilian side. It actually says that you need the express written permission of the police officer to obtain personnel records. There’s Section 50-a of the New York Civil Rights Code. It provides extraordinary protections to police officers. So, it’s extremely difficult for somebody, you know, even a family member of a victim, to get to those records. It’s almost impossible. And that’s one of the things that’s played out in this case.
AMY GOODMAN: Erica Garner, I wanted to get your response to Bernie Sanders now conceding that Hillary Clinton is the Democratic presumptive presidential nominee. You campaigned with Bernie Sanders. He made a TV commercial with you as the subject, taking on the issue of police brutality. What are your thoughts today, how your story, what happened to your dad, the issues you care about—are you also throwing your support to Hillary Clinton?
ERICA GARNER: I’ll throw my support towards any nominee, presidential nominee, that’s going to show me what the DOJ will look like, what they’re going to do about the crisis that’s going on in America right now, and that’s going to stand behind the chokehold bill. Letitia James has been putting that bill in for a while. She hasn’t gotten any support from anyone and—any other elected—
AMY GOODMAN: The Manhattan borough president.
ERICA GARNER: —any elected officials. And it’s like, you know, right now, every elected official in the House right now is up for election. And, you know, I say we refuse our vote until they hear our issues and fight for our issues.
JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And by chokehold bill, for those who are not aware, could you explain?
ERICA GARNER: This chokehold bill will make it illegal, all the way illegal, to—for the police officers to choke anyone. It’s in the policies of the New York Police Department policies, but it’s not actually a law.
AMY GOODMAN: According to The New York Times, the last time the federal government brought a deadly force case against an officer in New York was 1998, almost 20 years ago, when Francis Livoti stood trial, eventually was convicted of charges of choking to death a young Bronx man named Anthony Baez. I want to thank you both for being us. Erica Garner, even on this second anniversary of your father’s death, our condolences to you and your family. And thanks so much, Matt Taibbi, for being with us and pursuing this case for Rolling Stone and for your book.
That does it for our broadcast. After the conventions—we’ll be broadcasting two-hour specials every day from Cleveland next week and then the Democratic convention in Philadelphia—I’ll be doing a convention wrap-up at Provincetown Town Hall on the 29th of July and Martha’s Vineyard on the 30th.



The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

source: http://www.democracynow.org/2016/7/13/two_years_after_eric_garner_s

 
@WeCopwatch @WeCopwatch @WeCopwatch

Ramsey Orta, Activist Who Filmed Eric Garner’s Death, Needs Your Help

TOPICS:
ramseyBy Derrick Broze

WeCopWatch activist Ramsey Orta is expected to turn himself in to prison in early October for charges he says were trumped-up following his filming of the death of Eric Garner.  

The man who filmed the infamous video of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of the New York Police Department will soon become the only person who was present at Garner’s death to face prison time. Ramsey Orta is heading to prison for four years based on charges he says are a direct retaliation for filming Garner’s death.
“The man who filmed the police killing of Eric Garner, Ramsey Orta, is now heading to jail for four years on unrelated charges—making him the only person at the scene of Garner’s killing who will serve jail time,” TIME reported last summer.

“Last week Orta took a plea deal on weapons and drug charges. He says he has been repeatedly arrested and harassed by cops since he filmed the fatal police chokehold nearly two years ago.”

Ramsey told TIME he was living on State Island at the time of the death and  knew Eric Garner. After filming the death by chokehold and releasing it to the media, Ramsey began reporting harassment and intimidation from the police. According to TIME, Orta was arrested three times since August 2014. He says he was the victim of an attempted poisoning while he was behind bars.
 The first, for criminal possession of a handgun he allegedly tried to give a 17-year-old, came a day after Garner’s death was ruled a homicide by the city’s medical examiner. In February, he was arrested again on multiple charges of selling and possessing drugs. The third came on June 30 when he was accused of selling MDMA to an undercover cop. A lab test later showed that the alleged MDMA was fake and the charges were reduced. All told, Orta is facing more than 60 years in prison if convicted on all charges.

 The media and law enforcement have attempted to make an example out of Ramsey, attempting to paint him as a criminal for law infractions that took place in his past. Orta was found guilty of attempted sale of a controlled substance in 2011 and criminal possession of stolen property in 2012. Ramsey now prepares to turn himself into prison in October and WeCopWatch, the activist group that recruited Ramsey, says he is going to need ongoing support.

NYCramsey orta

“When we pulled Ramsey into WeCopwatch a year ago we began to see first hand the type of treatment Ramsey had been experiencing,” reads a forthcoming statement from Kevin Moore, David Whitt and Jacob Crawford of WeCopwatch. “Covert and overt surveillance, as well as coordinated online attacks which were carried out to discredit Ramsey, separate him from his support network, and put his life in danger, specifically once he was behind bars.”

WeCopWatch says Ramsey “was targeted because of his courage” and insists he is not guilty. The group says Ramsey was set up on a weapons charge despite not being in possession of a gun. 

“He was arrested, his charges were stacked, and his charges were all folded into one case putting him in a situation where was he was facing decades of prison time,” the group writes. WeCopWatch says they have also been the victims of infiltration attempts and surveillance.

Despite his upcoming imprisonment, Ramsey Orta remains optimistic and defiant. Orta says that his story would have been forgotten had it not been for the support of activists and family members.

“I’m glad to see people coming around on these bad terms to learn and understand what we as Black and Brown people are fighting,” Orta told Activist Post. “Never forget we are one, we are all Brothers and Sisters, and most of all we want peace. We want an end to Police Brutality, and the start of holding police accountable. We the people want to feel safe and not worry if our kid is next. All we want is justice.”

WeCopwatch has launched a new Facebook page that will provide updates on Ramsey Orta’s situation and information on how supporters can help him directly. The group will post Orta’s mailing address once he is housed in prison. Until then you can donate to his PayPal Ortaramsey@gmail.com and get regular updates of how he is and what he needs at the Support Ramsey Orta Facebook page.
 
Derrick Broze is an investigative journalist and liberty activist. He is the Lead Investigative Reporter for ActivistPost.com and the founder of the TheConsciousResistance.com. Follow him on Twitter. Derrick is the author of three books: The Conscious Resistance: Reflections on Anarchy and Spirituality and Finding Freedom in an Age of Confusion, Vol. 1 and Finding Freedom in an Age of Confusion, Vol. 2
Derrick is available for interviews. Please contact Derrick@activistpost.com
This article may be freely reposted in part or in full with author attribution and source link.

OUTRAGEOUS!! RAMSEY ORTA IS INNOCENT!! + "NYPD - BIGGEST GANG IN NEW YORK?" WATCH - 23/08/16

Ramsey...awaiting trial
 


NYPD - Biggest Gang in New York?
        


Published on Aug 20, 2016